Wilkes-Barre Cosmetic Dentist: 4 Less Known Causes of Discolored Teeth

Wilkes-Barre Cosmetic Dentist: 4 Less Known Causes of Discolored Teeth

When you think of teeth stains, soda, coffee, and sweets usually get the blame. This is because of their acidic nature and high chromogen content that causes yellowish teeth. The truth is, there are things that cause those colors on the teeth other than the food you consume. A Wilkes Barre cosmetic dentist from Back Mountain Dental reveals four of the less-popular causes of teeth discoloration.

A Toast for White Teeth

Medication

Most medicines we take have side effects, and some of them result in or contribute to teeth discoloration. Certain types of antibiotics, for example, bring a blue-gray or yellow-brown color to teeth. Cough syrups, meanwhile, cause dryness in the mouth, a condition perfect for decay since it impairs salivary secretion, removing the mouth’s natural cleaner of plaque, dirt and stain.

Excessive Fluoride

Too much or too little of something is damaging. The same thing applies to fluoride. Although fluoride is an element that helps keep the teeth stronger, too much of it could result in fluorosis, a condition characterized by the increased porosity of the enamel and marked by white spots, brown stains, or cloudy patches. The condition starts from childhood and is caused by the intake of fluoridated water, tablets, toothpastes etc.

Pool Water

The pH level of the water in an average pool is basic, meaning it’s no more acidic than a person’s own saliva. Since solids dissolve in acids and solidify in bases, tiny particles of food in your mouth tend to harden when exposed to water in swimming pools. According to OralAnswers.com, the antimicrobial components of the pool water also break down protein in your mouth and combine them with the solidified minerals, resulting in yellowish-brown spots.

Biological Makeup

Just as you would inherit a curly hair or blue eyes, teeth whiteness is inheritable, too. Whiteness is determined by the thickness of the enamel. If it’s thin, the dentin (the inner teeth layer that’s yellowish by nature) shows through. This explains why some people tend to have relatively whiter teeth than others. Enamel, too, gradually erodes with aging so if you’re born with a thin enamel, then your teeth is more likely to appear discolored.

If you have severely discolored teeth and would like to make your smile look better, visit a cosmetic dentist from a Wilkes-Barre dental practice like Back Mountain Dental. Generally, tooth discoloration is treated using whitening methods such as deep bleaching. The final procedure, however, would depend on your other dental conditions, which the dentist will determine. He/she may recommend other dental cosmetic solutions if you’re not qualified for the typical treatment.

(Source: Can Chlorine in Swimming Pools Dissolve or Stain Your Teeth? OralAnswers.com)

About James DeFinnis

James DeFinnis has written 85 post in this blog.